Category Page: Conserving BCD

Culturally Rich Agroecosystems: Maintaining Traditional Beliefs for Food Security in Nepal

Project Contributor: Laxmi Pant Nepalese “rice culture” has provided important options to address the needs of ecosystems and local communities together, particularly in areas that are diverse, complex and resource poor. The cultivation of diverse landraces of rice has advantages over “improved” rice varieties, both ecologically and culturally. Despite greater economic value of improved varieties,

Protecting Territories and Biodiversity: Indigenous Capacity Building in Ecuador

Project Contributor: Joao de Queiroz Ecuador’s Yasuni National Park comprises almost one million hectares of exceptional biological diversity and includes species such as the giant river otter, jaguar, harpy eagle and 62 species of snake. Adjacent to the Park is the Huaorani Indigenous Territory, with 600,000ha that have been declared a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve. Indigenous

Countering Fish Stock Depletion through Traditional Knowledge, Tenure, and Use of Marine Resources in Papua New Guinea

Project Contributors: Martha Macintyre, Simon Foale Fish stocks around Lihir Island in PNG are threatened by over-harvesting, as determined by research conducted by Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization. There is a real need to understand current and projected use of near-shore fishery resources in the context of rapid social and economic changes driven

Recording Traditional Knowledge of Biodiversity for the People’s Biodiversity Register of India

Project Contributor: Yogesh Gokhale India is rich in biodiversity resources and the associated traditional knowledge of the properties and uses of these resources. However, the social, political, economic, technological and cultural milieu is changing rapidly, and this is significantly affecting the way in which India’s living resources are being used. Further, India is lacking in

Promoting Cultural and Biological Diversity: An Educational Program for Rural Communities in Peru

Project Contributor: Jorge Ishizawa with Grimaldo Rengifo The Peruvian Andes are recognized as a major site of biological diversity in the world. The Andes have 82 of the planet’s 103 life zones, that is, 80% of the ecoclimatic zones existing on the planet (Valladolid, 1998). These range from the coastal desert area to the arid

Integrating Customary Tenure Systems in Marine Protected Areas: A Solomon Islands Example

Project Contributor: Shankar Aswani Protected areas presently cover less than 0.5% of the land and seascapes of the Solomon Islands. In part, this is because Solomon Islands legislation lacks specific and appropriate provisions for creating protected areas, but the creation of protected areas is also complicated by patterns of land tenure. Land use is determined

Endangered Languages, Endangered Knowledge: Vanishing Voices of the Great Andamanese of India

Project Contributor: Anvita Abbi Project Website: www.andamanese.net The Andamanese represent the last survivors of the pre-Neolithic population of Southeast Asia. Genetic research (Thangaraj et al., 2005) indicates that the Andamanese tribes are the remnants of the first migration from Africa that took place 70,000 years ago. Of the 50 remaining Great Andamanese people who live

A “Life Plan” for the Park: Culturally Appropriate Management in Brazil’s Xingu Indigenous Park

Project Contributor: Darron Collins The concept of “National Park” in Brazil incorporates the dual objectives of protecting the environment and the indigenous populations living within its boundaries. Parks are administered by the National Indian Foundation (known in Brazil as FUNAI) and the Brazilian government’s environmental agency. The Xingu Indigenous Park, a 6.5-million acre area of

Taboos and Conservation: Traditional Conservation Sites in the Marshall Islands

Project Contributor: Nancy Vander Velde with Jorelik Tibon In previous times, tribal chiefs could designate an island, a section of land or reef as being mo, or “taboo”. These areas were off-limits to people in general, being reserved for only certain personages and purposes. As in other countries, however, changes in biodiversity and culture have

Local Knowledge and Self-Determination for Conservation: The Case of the Irular of Tamil Nadu, India

Project Contributor: C. Manjula Irular people inhabiting the southern part of India are one of the 635 indigenous tribal communities of the country. The population of indigenous tribal peoples in India, known collectively as Adivasis (original inhabitants), is estimated to be over 84 million people. Despite these high numbers, these communities usually live on the