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Educational Intelligence: Learning about Place and Country through Aboriginal Art and Activism in Sydney, Australia

by Stephen Houston “We have survived the white man’s world.” —from the song “We Have Survived,” written and performed by Bart Willoughby with the Aboriginal band No Fixed Address, 1981 Despite the intensifying market pressures on land and the lifeworld, the power of Country as a living and sustaining force is re-asserting itself in Australia—that

Yamani Project Artists

Yamani: Voices of an Ancient Land

This page complements the photo essay “Yamani: Voices of an Ancient Land,” which presents a unique musical project by the same name, developed by six extraordinary Australian Indigenous women. They came together to support the revitalization of Aboriginal languages and the strengthening of Indigenous identity by creating, singing, and recording songs in their six different

No More Invisible People on Secret Committees: An Aboriginal Man’s Fight for Cultural Safety

Mark Lock interviewed by Stephen Houston Stephen Houston: Can you please introduce yourself? Mark Lock: I am Mark Lock from the Ngiyampaa people, an Australian Aboriginal tribe from rural Australia. You can see that I have “fair” skin and blue eyes because of my mixed heritage (Latvian, Scottish, English, and Scandinavian, in addition to Ngyampaa).

The Power of Place Names | Embedding Bama Local Languages into the Australian Landscape

by Michaela Jeannaisse Carter . . In July 2017, I abandoned my Pacific Northwest summer break in North America in favor of a tropical winter internship a little closer to home. I flew across the Pacific Ocean to join a small but ambitious effort that was about to begin on the ancestral homelands of the Bama

Gloriously Entwined | Nature and Culture, Art and Agriculture

by Eliza Smith .  .  It was a specific moment in 2013, while attending a farmer club meeting in rural Kenya, that sparked my curiosity. Patrick Kiirya, the meeting facilitator, as well as minister for agriculture in the Busoga Kingdom in Uganda and an agroecology enthusiast, asked participants to perform a song about the value of