Tag

Mangroves, Education, and Recovery of the Territory: Biocultural Diversity in Bahía Solano, Colombia

mangroves

Text by Felipe Rodríguez Moreno and Norma Constanza Castaño Cuéllar Photos by Felipe Rodríguez Moreno Bahía Solano is a municipality located in the Chocó District on the Pacific coast of Colombia, which over the past decades has undergone profound social and cultural transformations. A decree by the Colombian government created Bahía Solano as an agricultural

The Sweeping Dance: Cultural Revival, Environmental Conservation, and the Art of Broom Making in St. Lucia

brooms

Laurent Jean Pierre “What is it that one has in one’s dwelling place, that until you dance with it, it does not work for you?” “The broom.” —Traditional St. Lucian Tim Tim riddle Latanyé brooms (brooms made from the indigenous palm Coccothrinax barbadensis, locally known as Latanyé) have been around in St. Lucia for a

Shle’muxun: Reconnecting with the Salish Sea Bioregion

Salish Sea

by Daniel Kirkpatrick Florence James smiled and said the word again, a little more slowly: “Shle’muxun.” The fifty or so people in the audience quietly rolled the sound across their tongues, trying it out. A helper took a marker and wrote out the word on butcher paper, checked the spelling with Florence, and posted the

A Chicken for Every Occasion: Exploring the Significance of India’s Native Poultry Breeds

Kanna K. Siripurapu and Sabyasachi Das A few months ago, I received a document written by my colleague Uday Kalyanapu about the success of a backyard poultry project in the tribal-dominated areas of the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh. The project was started by WASSAN (Watershed Support Services and Activities Network), the organization with which

The Obvious Mirror: How Biocultural Diversity Is Reflected in the Natural World

Reflection of the natural world

Nejma Belarbi “All things in creation are sacred and have a diversity much beyond our understanding.” ―My grandmother, Fakhita Jazouli “Get on your hands and knees on the side of the dirt road and look down to find medicinal plants. A square foot will do.” I immediately felt that would be all but impossible. When

Listening to Our Ancestors: Biocultural Diversity through the Indigenous Lens

Evenk reindeer herder

Text by Jon Waterhouse Photos by Mary Marshall We are now living in the digital era, when practically every component of our lives appears to be moving at an ever-increasing, unstoppable pace. In many instances it is clear that we humans are not capable of keeping up with the technology we are creating, even as

Mirroring the Land: Biocultural Diversity Embodied

biocultural diversity

Sonja Swift When it rains in California I rejoice. I see the land drinking. I see grass blades emerging, shining jade green where there was only thatch, brittle and crisp, next to a stone-dry cow patty. I know the dusty taste of summer here, and the dread of summer prolonged. I know the feeling of

Cornerstone of Resilience: Reflections on the Diversity of Species and Cultures

Life’s traces

Text by Olga Mironenko Photos by David Rapport Our planet is populated by an incredibly wide variety of creatures. Coming in different sizes and with different sets of adaptations to their respective environments, they inhabit the so-called planetary envelopes: hydrosphere, cryosphere, lower layers of the atmosphere, and upper layers of the lithosphere, creating a unique

Biocultural Diversity: Reason, Ethics, and Emotion

Community in Zimbabwe

David Harmon A few years ago, Luisa Maffi shared an email with me. It was from a writer, well-traveled and worldly, with a background in both anthropology and biology. He had spent considerable time in Mexico walking the countryside, thinking in the open air, trying to unlock aspects of his experience that were eluding his

No Word for Goodbye: Reclaiming Abalone’s Home on the California Coast

Ross feature image

Jacquelyn Ross The moon glows overhead, brushing the waves with silver as they roll into shore. Down, under the surface, a soft cloud is released into the water. And, close by, another cloud. And then, as the wisps of eggs and sperm from female and male meet and mingle, a baby abalone starts its life.