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It’s Hard to Know

biocultural diversity

by Mary Louise Pratt I grew up in small-town Ontario, in the part of Canada made famous by writer Alice Munro. From the time I was five years old in the 1950s, I spent every summer of my childhood, and part of nearly every summer after that, on a little bay on the west side of

Edges of Transformation | Women Crossing Boundaries between Ecological and Social Healing

biocultural diversity

by Jeanine M. Canty Everything interesting happens at the edges. As we are moving to restore our relationships with nature, including one another, in an extremely diverse and globally connected planet, the knowledge we need is held by those who are crossing boundaries between fixed viewpoints, restoring relationship with place, holding multiple ways of being, and

When Home Becomes a Protected Area: The Udege People and the Bikin River Valley in the Russian Far East

Udege

by Aleksandra Bocharnikova The Sikhote-Alin is a mountain range in Russia’s Pacific Far East. This territory contains one of the largest unmodified temperate forests in the Northern hemisphere. The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) states that its protected areas are “considered to contain the greatest plant and animal diversity on the north-western

Cracked Earth | Indigenous Responses to Nepal’s Earthquakes

biocultural diversity

by Sara Shneiderman and Mark Turin “My heart is still shaking,” said Ram Bahadur when we spoke with him the day after the first massive earthquake  —  7.9 on the Richter Scale  —  struck Nepal on April 25, 2015. Almost five months later, he and other members of the Indigenous Thangmi community in Nepal are still

Decolonial Mapmaking | Reclaiming Indigenous Places and Knowledge

A rebbilib

by Jordan Engel “More indigenous territory has been claimed by maps than by guns. This assertion has its corollary: more indigenous territory can be defended and reclaimed by maps than by guns.” — Bernard Nietschmann, geographer Throughout time and across cultures, the thing that is often most important to a people is land. While global industrial society’s

Irony as Inspiration: From Academic Research to Community Action in Protecting Biocultural Landscapes

biocultural diversity

by Kelly Bannister and George Nicholas It is Fall 2014. At the Musqueam Cultural Centre near Vancouver in coastal British Columbia (BC), a meeting is taking place of an international team of cultural heritage scholars, professionals, and Indigenous community experts. The group is holding its final gathering to conclude a seven-year, multimillion-dollar university-based research initiative

Traditional Treasure: Local Knowledge for Climate Change Adaptation in Bangkukuk Taik, Nicaragua

biocultural diversity

by Marie Besses and Martina Luger It’s 7 a.m., still early enough to leave Bluefields with a panga (skiff boat). The captain is watching the sky with a little concern. A gentle breeze is blowing, and it’s important to leave early before the wind stirs up the sea causing large waves. It takes two hours

Culturally-Mediated Disturbance: Building a Bridge Between Knowledge Systems to Conserve Biocultural Diversity in New Guinea

Hewa traditions

by William H. Thomas Buried deep within the Western psyche rests a romantic myth that neither evidence nor exposure has been able to extinguish—the Noble Savage. Although it no longer has scientific currency, the idea that traditional societies uncorrupted by civilization are able to live in balance with their surroundings continues to subtly permeate the

Free-Flow: Why Cultural Diversity Matters for Healthy Rivers

biocultural diversity

by David Groenfeldt It has been proposed that we are living in a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene, in recognition that today the number one actor on the physical condition of the planet is not volcanoes or oceans or earthquakes, but us—people. We are only beginning to come to terms with our power, but one

Place Names and Storytelling | Balancing the Opportunities & Challenges of Sharing Biocultural…

by Jon Corbett, Christine Schreyer, and Nicole Gordon   “Every language is an old-growth forest of the mind, a watershed of thought, an ecosystem of spiritual possibilities.” — Wade Davis, 2005 There is a fundamental and synergistic relationship between language, culture, and biological diversity. Within Canada and around the world, Indigenous communities face the parallel losses of