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Tunun Kayutukun: Words Have Power

hunters

Ilarion (Larry) Merculieff and Libby Roderick Contrary to most people in modern societies who see words simply as vehicles for conveying information or expressing thoughts and feelings, people in traditional Indigenous societies view words as entities that carry great power; therefore, they must be chosen and used with utmost care. Most non-Indigenous people don’t view

Listening to Our Ancestors: Biocultural Diversity through the Indigenous Lens

Evenk reindeer herder

Text by Jon Waterhouse Photos by Mary Marshall We are now living in the digital era, when practically every component of our lives appears to be moving at an ever-increasing, unstoppable pace. In many instances it is clear that we humans are not capable of keeping up with the technology we are creating, even as

Mirroring the Land: Biocultural Diversity Embodied

biocultural diversity

Sonja Swift When it rains in California I rejoice. I see the land drinking. I see grass blades emerging, shining jade green where there was only thatch, brittle and crisp, next to a stone-dry cow patty. I know the dusty taste of summer here, and the dread of summer prolonged. I know the feeling of

Cornerstone of Resilience: Reflections on the Diversity of Species and Cultures

Life’s traces

Text by Olga Mironenko Photos by David Rapport Our planet is populated by an incredibly wide variety of creatures. Coming in different sizes and with different sets of adaptations to their respective environments, they inhabit the so-called planetary envelopes: hydrosphere, cryosphere, lower layers of the atmosphere, and upper layers of the lithosphere, creating a unique

Flourishing at Twenty-Five: On Context and Foundations in the Rise of the Concept of Biocultural Diversity

biocultural diversity

K. B. Wilson In his essay “Biocultural Diversity: Reason, Ethics, and Emotion” (this issue of Langscape), David Harmon traces the emergence of the field of biocultural diversity as a call for an engagement with the beautifully rich complexity of life. In my own take on biocultural diversity, I ponder the rise of the concept (and

Biocultural Diversity: Reason, Ethics, and Emotion

Community in Zimbabwe

David Harmon A few years ago, Luisa Maffi shared an email with me. It was from a writer, well-traveled and worldly, with a background in both anthropology and biology. He had spent considerable time in Mexico walking the countryside, thinking in the open air, trying to unlock aspects of his experience that were eluding his