Tag

Orpul as a Place of Mind: Integrating Local Ritual into School Curriculum to Sustain Biocultural Diversity in Tanzania

biocultural diversity

by Heidi Simper “A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin, and culture is like a tree without roots.” –Marcus Garvey During the rainy season in the bush of the Great African Rift Valley in Eastern Tanzania, amid Maasai culture, acacia trees, and cries of hyenas in the night, I was conducting my

Mangroves, Education, and Recovery of the Territory: Biocultural Diversity in Bahía Solano, Colombia

biocultural diversity

Text by Felipe Rodríguez Moreno & Norma Constanza Castaño Cuéllar Photos by Felipe Rodríguez Moreno Bahía Solano is a municipality located in the Chocó District on the Pacific coast of Colombia, which over the past decades has undergone profound social and cultural transformations. A decree by the Colombian government created Bahía Solano as an agricultural

It’s Hard to Know

biocultural diversity

by Mary Louise Pratt I grew up in small-town Ontario, in the part of Canada made famous by writer Alice Munro. From the time I was five years old in the 1950s, I spent every summer of my childhood, and part of nearly every summer after that, on a little bay on the west side of

At Home Between Sciences and Humanities: Biocultural Diversity as Source and Object of Interdisciplinary Dialogue

biocultural diversity

by Cristina Muru As main players in the academic debate, the Sciences and the Humanities have started a dialogue only in recent years. Until a few decades ago, the science, technology, engineering, and medicine sectors (STEM) and the humanities, arts, and social sciences sectors (HASS) largely ignored one another, having traditionally followed different aims and

Isafarn Nudrar: Flowerpots Help Preserve Biocultural Diversity in the High Atlas, Morocco

medicinal plants

by Irene Teixidor Toneu Isafarn nudrar means “medicinal plants from the mountains” in Tashelhit, one of the three Berber languages spoken in Morocco. Recently, in collaboration with the Global Diversity Foundation, I spent six months documenting medicinal plant use in the High Atlas and understanding the environmental and cultural landscapes in which plants are used.

Edges of Transformation | Women Crossing Boundaries between Ecological and Social Healing

biocultural diversity

by Jeanine M. Canty Everything interesting happens at the edges. As we are moving to restore our relationships with nature, including one another, in an extremely diverse and globally connected planet, the knowledge we need is held by those who are crossing boundaries between fixed viewpoints, restoring relationship with place, holding multiple ways of being, and

When Home Becomes a Protected Area: The Udege People and the Bikin River Valley in the Russian Far East

Udege

by Aleksandra Bocharnikova The Sikhote-Alin is a mountain range in Russia’s Pacific Far East. This territory contains one of the largest unmodified temperate forests in the Northern hemisphere. The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) states that its protected areas are “considered to contain the greatest plant and animal diversity on the north-western

Cracked Earth | Indigenous Responses to Nepal’s Earthquakes

biocultural diversity

by Sara Shneiderman and Mark Turin “My heart is still shaking,” said Ram Bahadur when we spoke with him the day after the first massive earthquake  —  7.9 on the Richter Scale  —  struck Nepal on April 25, 2015. Almost five months later, he and other members of the Indigenous Thangmi community in Nepal are still

Country Minds and the Age of Restoration

biocultural diversity

by Bob Weeden I often think about this marvelous planet, both the place we call home and the world beyond our personal experience. I think in words and pictures. The words are about a wrong turn we made somewhere, unknowingly and with good intentions but bad consequences. The consequences to people are crowding, inequality, unfairness, despair,

Biocultural Diversity Conservation Tourism | The Gamaran Protected Forest, West Sumatra, Indonesia

by Tom Corcoran . To Walk in the Gamaran Protected Forest Given the myriad of contradictions, spending time in the ancient forests of West Sumatra with Minangkabau people (Minang) is perhaps a challenge for the mind and spirit of any conservationist. Traditionally a people of the forest, the Minang are the world’s largest matrilineal society, with

  • 1
  • 2