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Doña Dora and Her Tehuelche Animals: Stories of Language Revitalization in Southern Patagonia

biocultural diversity

by Javier Domingo in conversation with Dora Manchado Getting to Doña Dora’s home on foot is no picnic. It’s a long way, and stray dogs can be a serious threat. But it’s all part of my job with the Intercultural Bilingual Education System of Santa Cruz, coordinated by anthropologist Marcela Alaniz. It’s what I call

Cherokee Voices for the Land | Photovoice Film by the Cherokee Nation Medicine Keepers

biocultural diversity

by Clint Carroll . . Amid the ever-present concerns throughout Indigenous communities over the health and vitality of our people, lands, and ways of life, our elders represent sources of knowledge and wisdom that we rely on for guidance and direction. Yet, increasingly, traditional ways of passing down knowledge through person-to-person relationships and kinship bonds

Māori Oral Tradition | Ancestral Sayings and Indigenous Knowledge

by Hēmi Whaanga and Priscilla Wehi . . E koekoe te tūī, e ketekete te kākā, e kūkū te kererū “The tūī chatters, the parrot gabbles, the wood pigeon coos.” (A saying for “It takes all kinds…”) Hēmi: As a young child, I often sat at the window of my house peering out at the

Jaqin Uraqpachat Amuyupa | The Aymara Cosmological Vision

by Amy Eisenberg “K’utarapxiw quqanakasxa, ukatxa phichantapxarakiw, quqa tunu lawanaks jik’irapxi, ukatsi janipu-niw jik’supkit qhuya tunu saphanakasxa.” “One should take pride in one’s land and culture. There is a popular saying in Aymara: ‘They cut our branches, they burn our leaves, they pull out our trunks… but never could they overtake our roots.’ This was

Maintaining the Linguasphere in the Anthropocene

linguistic diversity

by Peter Bridgewater .. One of the books that most influenced me as a young student was The Phenomenon of Man by Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, a Jesuit priest who trained as a paleontologist and geologist. His work on evolution, though not uncontested, remains some the most important in the world of paleontology. In The

Protecting Biodiversity in Dakshinkali, A Sacred Grove in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal

biodiversity

A Photo Essay by Sheetal Vaidya and Asha Paudel Dakshinkali is a sacred grove located at 1550 m of altitude about 22 km south of Nepal’s capital, Kathmandu. It is a local symbol of divinity, devoted to the Goddess Kali. Hindus consider Kali to be the supreme, dark female power whose role is to destroy evil.

To the Golden Mountains of Altai, Southern Siberia | A Journey of Language and Soul

traditional knowledge

By Joanna Dobson . I traveled to Altai for the second time in 2002. On my first visit there two years back, the landscapes of this small republic in southern Siberia made such a profound impression on me that I felt I had to return. When I recall this second journey, I find that I am

Like Growing Flowers | The Work of Saving Endangered Languages

endangered languages

By Ajuawak Kapashesit Language endangerment is a growing issue around the globe. Of the less than 7,000 languages spoken today, many are not expected to survive into the next century. Because of this growing threat to our planet’s linguistic diversity  —  something that should be cherished as much as our biological diversity  —  many language

Linking Language and the Land | How Words, Stories, and Ceremonies Can Inform Discussion around Decision Making for the Kwakwa̱ka̱’wakw Peoples and Ceremonies

traditional knowledge

by Andrea Lyall . . Kwak̓wala is the Indigenous language of the Kwakwa̱ka̱’wakw on the mid-coast of present-day British Columbia. It expresses a connection to the land through words, stories, and ceremonies, which describe the patterns of the seasons, traditional use, important places, and cultural and spiritual values. When I was young, I remember walking in

Language, Landscape and Custom: A Synthesis for Memory

linguistic diversity

by Marilee K. Gloe .. One February day I made my way through Jordan’s al-Siq at Petra. Jutting skyward, the granite walls were shades of orange, peach, brown, and beige, whipped into curvatures and sharp edges by the passage of wind and water over time. The magnitude of the walls dwarfed all human presence. The winter

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