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Bahadar ’s Almanac: Oral Tradition in Northern Pakistan Makes People Resilient and Prepared for Natural Disasters

Gurnal village

Text by Zubair Torwali Photos by Aftab Ahmad When I still used to lend a hand in the fields to my father, now 78, he would refer to a certain guy, Bahadar |bahadər|, for his oral traditions about the right weather for sowing and harvesting. At that time, I was in college and was familiar

Heal the Land, Heal the People: Strengthening Relationships at Hwaaqw’um in the Salish Sea

Text by Joe Akerman (T’awaxwultun) | Photos by Xwaaqw’um Project . Maakw’stem ‘uw huliitun tst. Maaqkw’stem ‘uw slhilhukw’tul “Everything is what sustains us. Everything is interconnected.” This is a story about coming home to a Quw’utsun (Hul’q’umi’num, Coast Salish) village site to heal. To heal the land, relationships with one another, and the people and communities

The Obvious Mirror: How Biocultural Diversity Is Reflected in the Natural World

Reflection of the natural world

by Nejma Belarbi “All things in creation are sacred and have a diversity much beyond our understanding.” ―My grandmother, Fakhita Jazouli “Get on your hands and knees on the side of the dirt road and look down to find medicinal plants. A square foot will do.” I immediately felt that would be all but impossible.

Rooted in Place: Exercises in Belonging, Ecological Awareness, and Love

Radhika Borde What does it mean to have roots? In most cases the metaphor implies a genetic legacy, a cultural inheritance comprising a set of values and beliefs, or a connection with a place that comes from having spent one’s childhood there. In each of these cases there is an assumption that roots are passed

Visions from Within | Another Shot for Biocultural Conservation in the Cradle of Humankind

Text and Photos by Thor Morales . . Imagine you’re in the cradle of humankind. Cultures similar to yours have thrived in a seemingly barren, rock-strewn desert for thousands of years. But now, once frequently practiced rites, ceremonies, and traditions are losing vigor, and your mother tongue is falling by the wayside as you adopt a

Cornerstone of Resilience: Reflections on the Diversity of Species and Cultures

Life’s traces

Text by Olga Mironenko Photos by David Rapport Our planet is populated by an incredibly wide variety of creatures. Coming in different sizes and with different sets of adaptations to their respective environments, they inhabit the so-called planetary envelopes: hydrosphere, cryosphere, lower layers of the atmosphere, and upper layers of the lithosphere, creating a unique

Sustain, Benefit, Celebrate: Embedding Nature in Our Culture

Text and Photos by Rob Butler   In 2015, I flew to Ecuador, boarded a motorized canoe with a group of friends, and three hours later disembarked at a riverbank dock from which a boardwalk led us to a lagoon. There, guides and canoes awaited to take us to a rustic lodge immersed in Amazon

Hta: How Karen Farming Saved a Forest in Thailand and Its Poetry Changed International Policy

Text by Viveca Mellegård | Photos by Pernilla Malmer With words & lived experience of members of the Karen Community of Hin Lad Nai and input from Pernilla Malmer . . “Live with the water, care for the river, live with trees, care for the forest. Live with the fish, care for the spawning grounds, live

Never for Sale: Listening (or Not) to the Language of the Land

Sarah Lambert

by Page Lambert John and I are driving down an unfurling ribbon of highway en route to the Black Hills of Wyoming and the small town of Sundance, population 1222. I’m doing battle with the State’s Department of Transportation, which has decreed to realign a major state highway through the pristine heart of the ranchland

Monocultures of the Fields, Monocultures of the Mind | The Acculturation of Indigenous Farming of…

by Kanna K. Siripurapu, Sabnam Afrein, and Prasant Mohanty . . The connection between agriculture and major festivals of India, traditionally and predominantly an agrarian society, is unmistakable. The Indigenous agro-biodiversity and cultural diversity of the Indian subcontinent likely co-evolved over thousands of years in synchrony and harmony with each other. The winds are fast changing,

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