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Community and Biocultural Diversity Conservation in Ethiopia: Learning from Each Other

Text and Photos by Fassil Gebeyehu Yelemtu I shall tell the story of my community in this article, but let me first say a few words about my interest in biocultural diversity conservation. Being exposed to the modern world and looking at unsuccessful stories of nature conservation, I always ask myself what the missing link

into this processed woven land

biocultural diversity

by Momoe Malietoa von Reiche In the cool Of morning Moving waters fall Silently seeking Pathways to the sea Blue veined Crisscross a fractured landscape Nervous leftovers of Cultural powerlines that Carved vertical earths Into umbered lakes Reflecting Deceptive silver linings In the sun Shades of a troubled Paradise Lost in camouflaged lushness Azure oceans

A Few Short Journeys along the Nature-Culture Continuum: Reflections on Community-Led Conservation

by Jessica Brown In late 2016, I made my first visit to the sacred forest that belongs to a village in the Togo mountain range of eastern Ghana, hiking up a small mountain to the forest accompanied by a dozen or so people from the community. The sun was beginning to set over the Volta

There Is So Much More to a Story than Meets the Eye: Tales from the Dusun of Ulu Papar, Malaysia

traditional equipment to fish

by Marina Aman Sham Malaysia is a vast country with a mosaic of cultures blending Asian and European influences. Its natural heritage spans rainforests that are home to many species of endemic wildlife, the great heights of its mountains, and seas filled with amazing underwater creatures. I am from Sabah, the Malaysian portion of the

Biocultural Heritage in Fishing Villages in the Far North of Sweden

Joakim Boström, Anna-Märta Henriksson, and Marie Kvarnström In the villages of the Kalix archipelago in the far north of Sweden, the community-based organization Kustringen is aiming to conserve local and traditional knowledge, practices, and innovations related to fishing and archipelago life in general. The archipelago lies in the Bothnian Bay, the northernmost part of the

Innovations as Part of Sustainable Practices in Biocultural Landscapes: Experiences from Rotational Farming in the Hin Lad Nai Community of Northern Thailand

by Pernilla Malmer and Prasert Trakansuphakon . . Rotational farming is traditionally practiced in a variety of biocultural landscapes across the world and contributes to sustainable livelihoods and biodiversity conservation. Despite this, it is sometimes viewed as unsophisticated and even illegal, in particular, by powerful actors who prefer forests be used for exploitation or as

The Biocultural Fabric of Renosterveld: A Unique Ecosystem at the Heart of the Swartland, South Africa

wind-powered water pump

Text and Photos by Emmeline Topp “You know how the Swartland got its name? It’s the Black Land,” the farmer tells me. His face is lined beyond his thirty-two years, decades of weather and work deepening its contours and tanning its skin. “When the Europeans first arrived two hundred years ago, all they saw was

The Sweeping Dance: Cultural Revival, Environmental Conservation, and the Art of Broom-Making in St. Lucia

brooms

by Laurent Jean Pierre “What is it that one has in one’s dwelling place, that until you dance with it, it does not work for you?” “The broom.” —Traditional St. Lucian Tim Tim riddle Latanyé brooms (brooms made from the indigenous palm Coccothrinax barbadensis, locally known as Latanyé) have been around in St. Lucia for

Biocultural Diversity as Observed from the Hawaiian Nation

Text and Photos by Harvy King As humankind’s connection to land and water evolved, our development of agriculture produced the availability of abundant food systems. Our civilizations grew; our cultures became more diverse. Religious and spiritual relationships between humans and nature maintained overall well-being and progressively improved the quality of life. Then, something changed. Spirituality

Biocultural Features of Urban Gardens & Yards Enhance Place-making & Belonging in South African Townships

by Duncan Haynes, Michelle Cocks, and Charlie Shackleton . . South African cities and towns continue to reflect legacies of colonialism and apartheid, during which urban black Africans were restricted to living in designated areas, locally termed “townships.” Generally, townships were poorly serviced, with a high proportion of informal structures, backyard dwellers, and widespread poverty.

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