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Drawing the Line at the Black Line: The Indigenous Sages and Stewards of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, Colombia

Community meeting

Guillermo Rodríguez Navarro “Imagine a pyramid standing alone by the sea, each side a hundred miles long. It’s a mountain nearly four miles high. In its folds imagine every different climate on earth. This is the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, and the people hidden here call the Sierra the Heart of the World and

Pura Vida: Costa Rican Peasants Fight for a World That Contains Many Worlds

harlequin toad

Felipe Montoya-Greenheck Southern Costa Rica is one of the country’s most biodiverse regions, with ecosystems ranging from the highest tropical alpine peaks and glacial lakes in the Talamanca mountain range, to the lowland rainforests and Pacific mangroves, with an endless network of streams and rivers forming the Great Terraba River watershed. The region is home

Iawa: The Unfinished Kuruaya Symphony

Iawa

Miguel Pinheiro In the heart of the Amazon Rainforest, along the Xingu River and one of its tributaries, the Iriri, traces of an ancient, vanished population are found. The petroglyphs carved in the rocks tell a ghost story—faint echoes of faded voices that today we struggle to imagine alive. A language can be a map

Guardians of the Forest: Can Securing Indigenous Land Rights Help Combat Climate Change and Prevent the Next Pandemic?

Daniel Henryk Rasolt with artwork by Vannessa Circe   Traditional Indigenous territories are complex, adaptable, and resilient socio-ecological systems that contain the majority of the world’s biocultural diversity. But can Indigenous Peoples play a leading role in both combating climate change and preventing the next pandemic? Right now, there is a fair amount of rhetoric

Del Monte a la Cocina: Gathering Inspiration in Southern Chile

biocultural diversity

by Antonia Barreau, Sonia Aliante Raiguanque, Jesús Sánchez, Rosario Valdivieso, and Susannah R. McCandless What could be more local than wild, foraged foods, especially in a country where biogeographic isolation has generated high degrees of endemism? Wild foods contribute to Chile’s distinct cultural cuisine. In the south, they form an essential part of the traditional

Understanding the Meaning of Food and Work through Community Photography in Peru

men resting

by Rebecca Wolff, Francesco D’Angelo, Gonzalo Urbina, and Malena Martínez Peru has earned a name for itself as an international culinary destination. But the focus is often on the nation’s capital, Lima, as opposed to the Indigenous and rural areas of the country. In the region of Cusco, chef Virgilio Martinez has been using food

Doña Dora and Her Tehuelche Animals: Stories of Language Revitalization in Southern Patagonia

biocultural diversity

by Javier Domingo in conversation with Dora Manchado Getting to Doña Dora’s home on foot is no picnic. It’s a long way, and stray dogs can be a serious threat. But it’s all part of my job with the Intercultural Bilingual Education System of Santa Cruz, coordinated by anthropologist Marcela Alaniz. It’s what I call

Mangroves, Education, and Recovery of the Territory: Biocultural Diversity in Bahía Solano, Colombia

biocultural diversity

Text by Felipe Rodríguez Moreno & Norma Constanza Castaño Cuéllar Photos by Felipe Rodríguez Moreno Bahía Solano is a municipality located in the Chocó District on the Pacific coast of Colombia, which over the past decades has undergone profound social and cultural transformations. A decree by the Colombian government created Bahía Solano as an agricultural

Recovering Landscape Health and Cultural Resilience in the Sierra Tarahumara, Mexico

The Rarámuri people (also known as Tarahumara by non-Rarámuri) are an indigenous group living in the Sierra Tarahumara, a part of the Sierra Madre Occidental mountain range in the northern Mexican state of Chihuahua. This region of high sierras and deep canyons boasts an exceptional ecological diversity, and is home to some of the most

Strengthening Indigenous Cultural Heritage through Capacity Building in Costa Rica

Project Contributors: Hugh Govan with Rigoberto Carrera There are eight indigenous groups in Costa Rica, numbering some 63,800 people, which comprise 1.7% of the national population. Half of them are now settled in 24 reservations or territories, which cover an area of approximately 325,470ha or 6.3% of Costa Rica. The indigenous groups are: the Cabécar,

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