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Can the Cenotes be Saved?

Text and photos by Yolanda López-Maldonado (Yucatec Maya, Mexico) . “This is the account of how all was in suspense, all calm, in silence; all motionless, still, and the expanse of the sky was empty. . . . There was nothing standing, only the calm water, the placid sea, alone and tranquil. Nothing existed.”   — Popol

Biocultural Diversity on the Border | The Yaylas of the Western Lesser Caucasus

by Soner Oruç & Ceren Kazancı . . In 2016, we set off on a journey to the highlands (yaylas) of the Georgia–Turkey border region. We were very excited and eager to learn new things. We wanted to breathe some fresh mountain air, drink from pasture springs, and get in touch with the pastoralists of the

In Pursuit of Dreams: An Odyssey of Self-discovery and Homecoming of a Young Dhangar Man

biocultural diversity

Story by Somnath Dadas (Dhangar), age 22, India, with Kanna K. Siripurapu Chasing My Dreams I’m Somnath Dadas (22), a young Dhangar (shepherd) man, and this is my journey of self-discovery, a story of chasing my dreams and returning to my cultural roots. I’m a native of Kothale village of the Indian state of Maharashtra,

Del Monte a la Cocina: Gathering Inspiration in Southern Chile

biocultural diversity

by Antonia Barreau, Sonia Aliante Raiguanque, Jesús Sánchez, Rosario Valdivieso, and Susannah R. McCandless What could be more local than wild, foraged foods, especially in a country where biogeographic isolation has generated high degrees of endemism? Wild foods contribute to Chile’s distinct cultural cuisine. In the south, they form an essential part of the traditional

Grandmother Oak and Her Acorn Teachings

Sara Moncada and Maya Harjo We come here to listen. Under the beautiful Grandmother Oak grove that sits here along the tributaries of the Ignacio Creek watershed, we have come to listen to stories, to gather as community, to learn from one another and share good food. She is massive and very old, our Grandmother

Podcasting from the Native Seed Pod: Food Sovereignty Stories Nourish the Future

biocultural diversity

Melissa K. Nelson “We’re being guided by forces seen and unseen that are telling us it’s time to pick up the seeds again. It’s time to learn how to grow these foods again.” —Rowen White, Episode One, “Native Seed Revolution” Seeds and Stories. Seed stories and stories as seeds. How and why are they so

Can the Cenotes be Saved? Biocultural Conservation in Yucatán, Mexico

Text and photos by Yolanda López-Maldonado . “This is the account of how all was in suspense, all calm, in silence; all motionless, still, and the expanse of the sky was empty. . . . There was nothing standing, only the calm water, the placid sea, alone and tranquil. Nothing existed.” — Popol Vuh . . It’s rainy season in

Biocultural Diversity on the Border | The Yaylas of the Western Lesser Caucasus

by Soner Oruç & Ceren Kazancı . . In 2016, we set off on a journey to the highlands (yaylas) of the Georgia–Turkey border region. We were very excited and eager to learn new things. We wanted to breathe some fresh mountain air, drink from pasture springs, and get in touch with the pastoralists of the

Heal the Land, Heal the People: Strengthening Relationships at Hwaaqw’um in the Salish Sea

Text by Joe Akerman (T’awaxwultun) | Photos by Xwaaqw’um Project . Maakw’stem ‘uw huliitun tst. Maaqkw’stem ‘uw slhilhukw’tul “Everything is what sustains us. Everything is interconnected.” This is a story about coming home to a Quw’utsun (Hul’q’umi’num, Coast Salish) village site to heal. To heal the land, relationships with one another, and the people and communities

Photo Gallery: Story Map

by Jennifer McRuer and Nuevas Voces . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . This photo gallery is an extension of Story Map: Youth Reconnect to Place and Biocultural Heritage in Colombia by Jen McRuer. << Previous  |  Next >> . Volume 6, Issue 2 | Editorial | Table of Contents | Subscribe | Buy | Donate