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The Gift: Healing Mother Earth with Indigenous Women’s Wisdom

Broken Glass

Barbara Derrick About the Artwork In my artwork, I depict Tsilhqot’in stories, myths, beliefs, and culture as they are, life as it is for my people. I was born an artist, a dreamer, and a storyteller. The grandmothers say that women hold the genetic ties to the DNA of our mother’s mother. I am my

Is the Environment for Taking From or for Giving To? A Young Indigenous Economist Finds Answers in His Own Culture

Prafulla Kalokar with Kanna K. Siripurapu I am Prafulla Kalokar, 29 years old and a member of the Indigenous Nanda-Gaoli people, a semi-nomadic pastoralist community native to the Indian state of Maharashtra. I am a doctoral student in modern economics, perhaps one of the few from my community to have come this far. As an

This World Is Made for You

dreamcatcher

Darryl Whetung Our spirit isn’t red skin, or light skin, brown skin, white skin Or if we have red hair, brown or black hair, when will the buffalo herd come back here? Are we raven or are we eagle? We are families, we are equals It’s our wigwam, it’s our war song, or the moon that

You Need to Carry the Torch of Light

D’ulus Mukhin

D’ulus Mukhin (Even, Russian Federation), interviewed by Galya Morrell “As a child,” says D’ulus, “I was beaten at school on a daily basis. My classmates thought I was ugly. They did not like the shape of my eyes, and my ears were too big for them. I don’t hate my bullies; I hug them and

Biocultural Diversity as Observed from the Hawaiian Nation

Text and Photos by Harvy King As humankind’s connection to land and water evolved, our development of agriculture produced the availability of abundant food systems. Our civilizations grew; our cultures became more diverse. Religious and spiritual relationships between humans and nature maintained overall well-being and progressively improved the quality of life. Then, something changed. Spirituality

Jaqin Uraqpachat Amuyupa | The Aymara Cosmological Vision

by Amy Eisenberg “K’utarapxiw quqanakasxa, ukatxa phichantapxarakiw, quqa tunu lawanaks jik’irapxi, ukatsi janipu-niw jik’supkit qhuya tunu saphanakasxa.” “One should take pride in one’s land and culture. There is a popular saying in Aymara: ‘They cut our branches, they burn our leaves, they pull out our trunks… but never could they overtake our roots.’ This was

To the Golden Mountains of Altai, Southern Siberia | A Journey of Language and Soul

traditional knowledge

By Joanna Dobson . I traveled to Altai for the second time in 2002. On my first visit there two years back, the landscapes of this small republic in southern Siberia made such a profound impression on me that I felt I had to return. When I recall this second journey, I find that I am

Wild Speech | Listening Through the Portal of Imagination

biocultural diversity

by Geneen Marie Haugen . The second cougar-kill I’ve encountered in three days smells fresh: a sweetish, iron-tinged musk. The ribcage is red-stained and bare of meat; the neck has a tremendous bite mark. The deer is only partially covered with leaf litter and brush. I had not been expecting a carcass when I set off