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Biocultural Diversity on the Border | The Yaylas of the Western Lesser Caucasus

by Soner Oruç & Ceren Kazancı . . In 2016, we set off on a journey to the highlands (yaylas) of the Georgia–Turkey border region. We were very excited and eager to learn new things. We wanted to breathe some fresh mountain air, drink from pasture springs, and get in touch with the pastoralists of the

Nostalgia & Spleen: Feeding the Body, Rediscovering Self Through Sicilian Street Food

Sicilian Street Food

Text and Photos by Vincenzo Di Giorgi Last fall I was sitting on a marble bench right next to the Cala, a U-shaped cove in the coast of Palermo, watching the boats nearby being rocked by the gentle wind, their masts swaying. I was focusing on the wall painting on the other side of the

Biocultural Diversity on the Border | The Yaylas of the Western Lesser Caucasus

by Soner Oruç & Ceren Kazancı . . In 2016, we set off on a journey to the highlands (yaylas) of the Georgia–Turkey border region. We were very excited and eager to learn new things. We wanted to breathe some fresh mountain air, drink from pasture springs, and get in touch with the pastoralists of the

Rough Waves and Remembered Names in Haida Gwaii

traditional ecological knowledge

by Graham Richard On August 11, 2015 a Haida-language team set forth from G̱aaw on a three-day journey to survey the north and west coasts of Haida Gwaii (the archipelago off the north coast of British Columbia, Canada that is the Haida people’s homeland). Guided by elders’ teachings, the Haida language, historical records, and century-old maps,

Editorial | Rebuilding Sense of Place: At Home, and In the World

The People’s Issue, Part II Langscape Magazine Volume 4, Issue 2, Winter 2015 . Rebuilding Sense of Place: At Home, and In the World by Luisa Maffi . “Home is where you hang your hat,” goes a popular saying in the English language. That is, home is where you make it to be, where you feel comfortable, regardless

Traditional Treasure: Local Knowledge for Climate Change Adaptation in Bangkukuk Taik, Nicaragua

biocultural diversity

by Marie Besses and Martina Luger It’s 7 a.m., still early enough to leave Bluefields with a panga (skiff boat). The captain is watching the sky with a little concern. A gentle breeze is blowing, and it’s important to leave early before the wind stirs up the sea causing large waves. It takes two hours

Culturally-Mediated Disturbance: Building a Bridge Between Knowledge Systems to Conserve Biocultural Diversity in New Guinea

Hewa traditions

by William H. Thomas Buried deep within the Western psyche rests a romantic myth that neither evidence nor exposure has been able to extinguish—the Noble Savage. Although it no longer has scientific currency, the idea that traditional societies uncorrupted by civilization are able to live in balance with their surroundings continues to subtly permeate the

Wild Waters: Landscapes of Language

languages

by Dawn Wink . . . in the bottom of a dark canyon, I stood in a shroud of voices. They spun up the canyon walls, radiating through the dusky interior. . . The voices were part of a complex language, a language that formed audible words as water tumbled over rocks, and one that